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Gaurav Shetty- '17, MGM

In the interest of prepping T- birds for upcoming career fairs and networking events, Thunderbird’s Career Management Center recently hosted ‘How to Network like a Rockstar’, a pathway guide to improving networking skills. As an engineer and an MGM candidate myself, I could really connect to the stories and experiences of Mr. Jaymin. J. Patel, the networking coach, who graduated as an engineer from Youngstown State University and later did his MBA at Carnegie Mellon University.

J. Patel did not waste any time in diving into the heart of the subject matter. The thing that I found really unique about the session was the different perspectives on networking that he presented. First, of an MBA candidate with no work experience looking for a job, second, of a recruiter himself looking for potential hires. As a T-bird graduating this spring, I could relate to the anxieties, frustrations, and self-doubts that naturally come during the networking events. J. Patel had a step- by -step approach to overcoming these problems.

 

My top take-aways:

  1. Landing a job vs. landing a dream job: Succumbing to the peer pressure and the brand image of the Big 5s in any industry, one might be after a job or a company that is not a cultural fit for him/her. If a job doesn’t excite you to get up every day, then is the Big 5 really worth it?

  2. Synergy ‘1+1=3’: While you are looking for alumni or a company executive to connect with on LinkedIn or other social media, it is critical to find someone, who can be your Champion. One who can go above and beyond for you. It can only happen if that someone is like minded or has similar aspirations as you do. Building personal relationships with influencing individuals to positively impact career development can go a long way

  3. Stages of personal connection: Once you find your Champion, the connection usually happens in four stages: Awareness, Consideration, Acknowledgement, and Support. This also holds good for meeting with potential recruiters at career fairs.

  4. Being really specific: It is important to be really specific about the industry, function, country, company and the job role you want while talking to your Champion. That creates a positive impact on them. Also, helping your Champion to understand your preferred career paths once you enter a particular company would really help him or her visualize the same.

  5. 30-second elevator pitch: This should comprise of four major aspects: Who are you? What have you done? Where are you going? Why do you deserve it? Construct your elevator pitch in a such a way that, all the answers to these four question are tied together.

  6. Body language: Stand confidently with shoulders relaxed. If you are talking to a person, have one of your legs pointed toward the person and the other toward the room. This gives you the flexibility to adjust the tone of your body in line with your story. Keep your hands active all the time, instead of folding your arms or keeping your hands in your pocket.

  7. The exit: Always exit with an, ‘I do not want to take much of your time, if you do not mind let us connect on LinkediIn or email and continue the conversation,’ or a similar alternative. Never end with a ‘Nice meeting you, Keep in touch.’

  8. The follow up: This will usually be an email or a LinkediIn request. Make sure you send this out within 24 hours of your first meeting. Make sure you send the email between 8 a.m.. to and 6 p.m. unless it’s a weekend. Schedule time for follow-up emails, and DO NOT Copy/Paste emails. Make a clear and specific request for a follow-up call or discussion. Outline specific points that were discussed to help the recruiter/champion recall the conversation.

Overall, I certainly think I can benefit from these lessons. I hope you can too. If you are interested in knowing more about the speaker please visit www.jayminspeaks.com. And all the very best this recruiting season. It’s GO time!

For more blogs like this visit: https://gauravshettyblog.wordpress.com