Knowledge Network

Home / About / Knowledge Network / Students / Learning to Fly Online: A Letter to My Fellow Online MGM Students

Learning to Fly Online: A Letter to My Fellow Online MGM Students

October 16, 2017

Learning to Fly Online: A Letter to The Online MGM Students

By Aaron White, Online Master in Global Management
Das Tor Guest Writer

Here you are, on the precipice of a great journey—you are midway through your first set of courses as a Thunderbird Online Master of Global Management (OMGM) candidate. Most of you are teetering somewhere between exhilaration and trepidation. I know this because I was there.

I imagine many of you, like me, have full-time jobs that continuously stretch beyond typical 40-hour weeks. Ever-growing work obligations and family responsibilities constrict our already short weeks, and now you are about to pile an equally time-consuming commitment onto your metaphorical plate.

For myself, an average day starts out around 5:15 am, as the incessant screams of my alarm wake me up. I quickly get ready, scurry out the door, and head to the metro. I use the precious 30 or so minutes on the metro to catch up on some of the readings my professor has assigned. Once at work, the day flies by in a flurry of emails, calls, and meetings. When I get home sometime between 6:00 and 7:00 pm, I immediately start a Chinese lesson via Skype (which never seems to go as well as I would like). Finally, it’s time for homework, jumping back and forth among readings, video lectures, and projects. In between, I try to chat with my wife, hang out with my puppy, eat, exercise, and unwind. Sometime between 11:00 and midnight, when I just can’t keep my eyes open any longer, I crawl into bed and am whisked away to the land of slumber. And then before I know it, the cycle begins again.

When I reached out to my cohort and asked them to write about their experience as an online student at Thunderbird — what their day-to-day life looks like and how they cope with the multiple roles that they inhabit — I was not surprised to learn that they had very similar experiences.

Read the rest of the story...

Das Tor, Thunderbird Student Newspaper

Get Global Insight in Your Inbox

Join our mailing list